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Liv Albert

Let’s Talk about Myths, Baby! (podcast)

YEAR: 2017

COUNTRY: Canada

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Title of the work

Let’s Talk about Myths, Baby! (podcast)

Country of the First Edition

Country/countries of popularity

worldwide

Original Language

English

First Edition Date

2017

First Edition Details

Let’s talk about myths, Baby! A Greek and Roman mythology podcast, 20th July 2017, Episode 1 – Eatin’ Kids & Killin’ Dads, an Introduction to Greek Mythology - 21:10 minutes, bi-weekly.

Running time

5-50 minutes

Official Website

mythsbaby.com (accessed: April 2, 2020)

Available Onllne

mythsbaby.com (accessed: April 2, 2020)

Apple Podcasts (accessed: April 2, 2020)

Google Play (accessed: April 2, 2020)

Spotify (accessed: April 2, 2020)

Stitcher (accessed: April 2, 2020)

TuneIn (accessed: April 2, 2020)

Awards

Top 3 Mythology Podcasts (accessed: April 2, 2020) by Fedspot (2020).

Genre

Educational radio programs
Internet radio programs
Podcasts

Target Audience

Crossover (Teens, young adults, adults)

Cover

The podcast’s logo, courtesy of Liv Albert.


Author of the Entry:

Alessia Borriello, University of Bologna, alessia.borriello2@studio.unibo.it

Peer-reviewer of the Entry:

Elżbieta Olechowska, University of Warsaw, elzbieta.olechowska@gmail.com 

Daniel Nkemleke, ENS University of Yaoundé 1, nkemlekedan@yahoo.com

Female portrait

Liv Albert (Author, Producer)

Liv Albert studied English Literature and Classical Civilizations at Concordia University in Montreal. She is passionate about Greek Mythology and contemporary fantasy literature. In 2017, she started the Let’s Talk About Myths, Baby! podcast, as creator, host, and producer. It evolved from a bi-weekly to a weekly podcast, now in the Top 3 Mythology Podcasts of 2020 by Fedspot (accessed: April 2, 2020). From 2018, she is also a manager in the retail sector.


Sources:

Bio at mythsbaby.com (accessed: April 2, 2020).

LinkedIn's profile (accessed: April 2, 2020).


Bio prepared by Alessia Borriello, University of Bologna, alessia.borriello2@studio.unibo.it

Questionnaire

1. What drew you to writing/working with Classical Antiquity and what challenges did you face in selecting, representing, or adapting particular myths or stories?

I’ve always loved Classical Antiquity, and have had a passion for mythology since I was very young. I began to dive really deep when I started writing a novel set half in ancient Greece, from there I bought every book I could find and learned all I could. Shortly after, I decided to study the subject in university. The way I cover the myths can be inherently challenging as I choose to examine them from a modern lens. Discussing modern ideas of feminism and the rights of marginalized people can often rub some the wrong way since those things “didn’t matter back then”. But I carry on, I think it’s important not to gloss over the more problematic aspects.


2. Why do you think classical / ancient myths, history, and literature continue to resonate with young audiences?

The concepts and stories are timeless, and so very entertaining even now. The mythology is very grounded in humanity, something that hasn’t changed in the intervening millennia. Family squabbles, adventure, it’s all things we are still so interested in as a people, and examining how those things were dealt with thousands of years ago only adds to the intrigue.


3. Do you have a background in classical education (Latin or Greek at school or classes at the University?) What sources are you using? Scholarly work? Wikipedia? Are there any books that made an impact on you in this respect?

I have a bachelor’s degree in Classical Civilizations from the aptly named Concordia University in Montreal, Canada. I try to use as accurate sources as possible, when I can I use primary sources, and choose my translations where possible. As someone who only studied in Undergrad and isn’t in academia now, finding distinctly academic sources can be tricky, but I’m very selective with what I do use. At times I’ll refer to Wikipedia, as a source for easy to find information, but I only use it to find the sources listed, and then refer to those sources for anything I might actually include in the podcast.


4. Did you think about how Classical Antiquity would translate for young readers, esp. in (insert relevant country)?

I never considered how my podcast and it’s take on classical mythology would resonate with so many people, across age groups, and countries. I’m constantly surprised by how many people connect with it, either from a historical perspective, or story-telling, or just entertainment for the sake of it. It’s fascinating and very rewarding.


5. How concerned were you with "accuracy" or "fidelity" to the original? 

I try to be faithful to originals, where possible. Still, I try to interpret and retell in my own style, while ensuring it’s as accurate as possible. I am personally passionate about the consistent mistakes made in Hollywood (etc.) adaptations of Greek mythology and always want to ensure I’m being better than those two might have Perseus come upon a herd of “Pegasi”. Utter madness.


6. Are you planning any further forays into classical material?

I have been working on a novel based around Greek mythology for… too long. But in the very near future I intend to seek representation so I might finally try to get it published. I also plan to write a book of Greek mythology told in the style of my podcast.


Prepared by Alessia Borriello, University of Bologna, alessia.borriello2@studio.unibo.it


Summary

Let’s Talk About Myths, Baby! is a weekly podcast on ancient Greek mythology which has been awarded the prize of the Third Top Podcast within the Top Mythology Podcasts of 2020 by Feedspot (accessed: April 2, 2020). Many ancient Greek and Roman myths, along with a series on Homer’s epics and on Greek drama, are broadcast in a casual yet comprehensive enough manner by Liv, “a 30-something Millennial with a penchant for cursing and a feminist attitude”.

Episodes have various length, from 5 to 50 minutes. In particular, a sub-section of “Mini Myths” presents stories in a more concise way. Some single episodes are about transversal myth-based pop culture products; e.g., a September 24, 2019 podcast brings a discussion of Madeline Miller’s Circe, a 2018 bestseller about the legendary ancient Greek sorceress.

The listings of the track are divided into four main topic ranges:
The Olympians.
Heroes & Heroines.
Monsters & Beasts.
Characters & Stories.

Source: mythsbaby.com (accessed: April 2, 2020).

Analysis

Classical myths are told by Liv in a sarcastic and contemporary tone, yet the narrator proves to be quite knowledgeable. Liv’s newest twist to the retelling is a feminist approach and, while in a lighthearted way, it highlights mistreatments of women in ancient mythology. For example, parallels are drawn between mythical gods and present day “creepy” guys (e.g. the god Apollo chasing Dafne is compared, in a sarcastic way, to a modern stalker). As a result, the podcast ironically downplays the gods’ deeds. On the other hand, contemporary feminist issues are put forward, showing the deep roots of occidental sexist concepts. Nonetheless, this dynamic is effortlessly played out by Liv, using contemporary American slang, attracting listeners to ancient myths and showing them the everlasting power to engage people of any era.

In terms of accuracy of the material, Liv does not dissimulate her preferences for the versions of myths she picks (still, her aim remains to include as many versions of myths as possible). This is due to the oral nature of Greek myths and the circulation in ancient times of countless versions of a single story. To explain the concept, while talking about the wedding of Cadmus and Harmonia, Liv makes reference to Roberto Calasso’s Le nozze di Cadmo e Armonia. In fact, in this Italian contemporary novel, Calasso talks about a chain of myths which runs through the same stories yet retraces different outcomes of the mythical tradition. On her website (accessed: April 2, 2020) Liv announces that her stories are “deeply researched, thoroughly told, and they don’t hold back the details that have been sugarcoated and treated with kid gloves over the millennia.”

While showing detachment from the ancient Greek mentality, Liv lets perceive her attraction to the classic world. She studied Classical Civilizations at university and she informs listeners that, put aside any value judgment from contemporary perspective, ancient stories are just striking in their beauty. More often than not, she manifests open admiration for ancient myths, for pieces of art related to mythology (e.g. Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Apollo e Dafne), for novels inspired by classical mythology (e.g., Calasso, Miller).

With regard to technical aspects, the first podcast (20th July 2017) starts with a later insertion from the author, wherein she informs new listeners that she must improve audio quality and edit the tracks. Therefore, she advises against starting to watch from the first episode, and suggests trying first some more recent content for a more accurate first impression.


Further Reading

Pat Barker, The Silence of the Girls.

Roberto Calasso, Le nozze di Cadmo e Armonia.

Natalie Haynes, The Children of Jocasta.

Madeline Miller, Circe.

Madeline Miller, The Song of Achilles.

Yellow cloud
Leaf pattern
Leaf pattern

Title of the work

Let’s Talk about Myths, Baby! (podcast)

Country of the First Edition

Country/countries of popularity

worldwide

Original Language

English

First Edition Date

2017

First Edition Details

Let’s talk about myths, Baby! A Greek and Roman mythology podcast, 20th July 2017, Episode 1 – Eatin’ Kids & Killin’ Dads, an Introduction to Greek Mythology - 21:10 minutes, bi-weekly.

Running time

5-50 minutes

Official Website

mythsbaby.com (accessed: April 2, 2020)

Available Onllne

mythsbaby.com (accessed: April 2, 2020)

Apple Podcasts (accessed: April 2, 2020)

Google Play (accessed: April 2, 2020)

Spotify (accessed: April 2, 2020)

Stitcher (accessed: April 2, 2020)

TuneIn (accessed: April 2, 2020)

Awards

Top 3 Mythology Podcasts (accessed: April 2, 2020) by Fedspot (2020).

Genre

Educational radio programs
Internet radio programs
Podcasts

Target Audience

Crossover (Teens, young adults, adults)

Cover

The podcast’s logo, courtesy of Liv Albert.


Author of the Entry:

Alessia Borriello, University of Bologna, alessia.borriello2@studio.unibo.it

Peer-reviewer of the Entry:

Elżbieta Olechowska, University of Warsaw, elzbieta.olechowska@gmail.com 

Daniel Nkemleke, ENS University of Yaoundé 1, nkemlekedan@yahoo.com

Female portrait

Liv Albert (Author, Producer)

Liv Albert studied English Literature and Classical Civilizations at Concordia University in Montreal. She is passionate about Greek Mythology and contemporary fantasy literature. In 2017, she started the Let’s Talk About Myths, Baby! podcast, as creator, host, and producer. It evolved from a bi-weekly to a weekly podcast, now in the Top 3 Mythology Podcasts of 2020 by Fedspot (accessed: April 2, 2020). From 2018, she is also a manager in the retail sector.


Sources:

Bio at mythsbaby.com (accessed: April 2, 2020).

LinkedIn's profile (accessed: April 2, 2020).


Bio prepared by Alessia Borriello, University of Bologna, alessia.borriello2@studio.unibo.it


Summary

Let’s Talk About Myths, Baby! is a weekly podcast on ancient Greek mythology which has been awarded the prize of the Third Top Podcast within the Top Mythology Podcasts of 2020 by Feedspot (accessed: April 2, 2020). Many ancient Greek and Roman myths, along with a series on Homer’s epics and on Greek drama, are broadcast in a casual yet comprehensive enough manner by Liv, “a 30-something Millennial with a penchant for cursing and a feminist attitude”.

Episodes have various length, from 5 to 50 minutes. In particular, a sub-section of “Mini Myths” presents stories in a more concise way. Some single episodes are about transversal myth-based pop culture products; e.g., a September 24, 2019 podcast brings a discussion of Madeline Miller’s Circe, a 2018 bestseller about the legendary ancient Greek sorceress.

The listings of the track are divided into four main topic ranges:
The Olympians.
Heroes & Heroines.
Monsters & Beasts.
Characters & Stories.

Source: mythsbaby.com (accessed: April 2, 2020).

Analysis

Classical myths are told by Liv in a sarcastic and contemporary tone, yet the narrator proves to be quite knowledgeable. Liv’s newest twist to the retelling is a feminist approach and, while in a lighthearted way, it highlights mistreatments of women in ancient mythology. For example, parallels are drawn between mythical gods and present day “creepy” guys (e.g. the god Apollo chasing Dafne is compared, in a sarcastic way, to a modern stalker). As a result, the podcast ironically downplays the gods’ deeds. On the other hand, contemporary feminist issues are put forward, showing the deep roots of occidental sexist concepts. Nonetheless, this dynamic is effortlessly played out by Liv, using contemporary American slang, attracting listeners to ancient myths and showing them the everlasting power to engage people of any era.

In terms of accuracy of the material, Liv does not dissimulate her preferences for the versions of myths she picks (still, her aim remains to include as many versions of myths as possible). This is due to the oral nature of Greek myths and the circulation in ancient times of countless versions of a single story. To explain the concept, while talking about the wedding of Cadmus and Harmonia, Liv makes reference to Roberto Calasso’s Le nozze di Cadmo e Armonia. In fact, in this Italian contemporary novel, Calasso talks about a chain of myths which runs through the same stories yet retraces different outcomes of the mythical tradition. On her website (accessed: April 2, 2020) Liv announces that her stories are “deeply researched, thoroughly told, and they don’t hold back the details that have been sugarcoated and treated with kid gloves over the millennia.”

While showing detachment from the ancient Greek mentality, Liv lets perceive her attraction to the classic world. She studied Classical Civilizations at university and she informs listeners that, put aside any value judgment from contemporary perspective, ancient stories are just striking in their beauty. More often than not, she manifests open admiration for ancient myths, for pieces of art related to mythology (e.g. Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Apollo e Dafne), for novels inspired by classical mythology (e.g., Calasso, Miller).

With regard to technical aspects, the first podcast (20th July 2017) starts with a later insertion from the author, wherein she informs new listeners that she must improve audio quality and edit the tracks. Therefore, she advises against starting to watch from the first episode, and suggests trying first some more recent content for a more accurate first impression.


Further Reading

Pat Barker, The Silence of the Girls.

Roberto Calasso, Le nozze di Cadmo e Armonia.

Natalie Haynes, The Children of Jocasta.

Madeline Miller, Circe.

Madeline Miller, The Song of Achilles.

Yellow cloud