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Rose Nanje Mande

The Bakundu Creation Myth

YEAR:

COUNTRY: Cameroon

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Title of the work

The Bakundu Creation Myth

Country of the First Edition

Country/countries of popularity

Cameroon

Original Language

Lukundu

Country of the Recording of the Story for the Database

Cameroon

Full Date of the Recording of the Story for the Databasey

December 22, 2017

More Details of the Recording of the Story for the Database

Mbonge - Kumba

Genre

Myths

Target Audience

Crossover (young adults + adults)

Cover

Missing cover

We are still trying to obtain permission for posting the original cover.


Author of the Entry:

Divine Che Neba, University of Yaounde 1, nebankiwang@yahoo.com

Peer-reviewer of the Entry:

Daniel Nkemleke, University of Yaounde 1, nkemlekedan@yahoo.com

Eleanor Anneh Dasi, University of Yaounde 1, wandasi5@yahoo.com 

Susan Deacy, University of Roehampton, s.deacy@roehampton.ac.uk 

Female portrait

Rose Nanje Mande (Storyteller)

Age of narrator: 50 (in 2017)

Social status: Koro (Female elder)

Profession: Farmer

Language of narration: Lukundu


Bio prepared by Eleanor Anneh Dasi, University of Yaounde 1, wandasi5@yahoo.com and  Divine Che Neba, University of Yaounde 1, nebankiwang@yahoo.com


Origin/Cultural Background/Dating

Background: Please, see this entry (accessed: January 17, 2019).

Occasion: staged

Summary

In the beginning, Obase (God) created Kongwe Mountain. Since he was alone, he created the great Botu tree, which he planted on the Kongwe Mountain to produce all the species of things on earth. The branches of the great Botu tree brought forth the various creatures that exist in the world today. One of the branches brought forth the human race, another cats, another dogs, the cows, the water bodies, the rocks and every other thing that exists.

The branch that brought forth humans further forked into two: one brought forth the good human race while the other brought forth the bad human race. The good human race pleaded with the great Botu tree to extend its root abroad and cause the soil of Kongwe to be extended to other parts of the world so that the good human race could spread to the rest of the world. The bad human race did not, however, like this development. It wanted both races to be in the same place so that it could subdue the good human race. 

Before the Botu tree could expand its roots so that the good human race should fill other parts of the earth, the branch of the bad human race had introduced suffering and evil. That was how the whole world was created and also why evil dominates on the earth.

Analysis

This myth bears resemblance to creation myths that place God at the helm of creation. The myth does not only explain the creation of all things, but also serves as a medium through which the Bakundu people relate with the rest of the human community with respect to their worldview and cosmology. It suggests that Bakundu believe in a supreme creator deity who is supposed to be venerated for his wisdom and all-knowingness. Finally, the myth explains the origin of the concepts of good and evil and why evil seems to dominate the world. 

Further Reading

Sprout, Barbara. Primal Myths: Creation around the World, San Francisco: Harper Collins, 1979.

Von Franz, Marie-Louise. Creation Myths, Boston: Shambhala, 1995.

Addenda

Researcher: Divine Che Neba

Research Assistant: Lenya Colle Malike 

Editor: Eleanor Anneh Dasi

Method of data collection: Tape Recording

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Leaf pattern
Leaf pattern

Title of the work

The Bakundu Creation Myth

Country of the First Edition

Country/countries of popularity

Cameroon

Original Language

Lukundu

Country of the Recording of the Story for the Database

Cameroon

Full Date of the Recording of the Story for the Databasey

December 22, 2017

More Details of the Recording of the Story for the Database

Mbonge - Kumba

Genre

Myths

Target Audience

Crossover (young adults + adults)

Cover

Missing cover

We are still trying to obtain permission for posting the original cover.


Author of the Entry:

Divine Che Neba, University of Yaounde 1, nebankiwang@yahoo.com

Peer-reviewer of the Entry:

Daniel Nkemleke, University of Yaounde 1, nkemlekedan@yahoo.com

Eleanor Anneh Dasi, University of Yaounde 1, wandasi5@yahoo.com 

Susan Deacy, University of Roehampton, s.deacy@roehampton.ac.uk 

Female portrait

Rose Nanje Mande (Storyteller)

Age of narrator: 50 (in 2017)

Social status: Koro (Female elder)

Profession: Farmer

Language of narration: Lukundu


Bio prepared by Eleanor Anneh Dasi, University of Yaounde 1, wandasi5@yahoo.com and  Divine Che Neba, University of Yaounde 1, nebankiwang@yahoo.com


Origin/Cultural Background/Dating

Background: Please, see this entry (accessed: January 17, 2019).

Occasion: staged

Summary

In the beginning, Obase (God) created Kongwe Mountain. Since he was alone, he created the great Botu tree, which he planted on the Kongwe Mountain to produce all the species of things on earth. The branches of the great Botu tree brought forth the various creatures that exist in the world today. One of the branches brought forth the human race, another cats, another dogs, the cows, the water bodies, the rocks and every other thing that exists.

The branch that brought forth humans further forked into two: one brought forth the good human race while the other brought forth the bad human race. The good human race pleaded with the great Botu tree to extend its root abroad and cause the soil of Kongwe to be extended to other parts of the world so that the good human race could spread to the rest of the world. The bad human race did not, however, like this development. It wanted both races to be in the same place so that it could subdue the good human race. 

Before the Botu tree could expand its roots so that the good human race should fill other parts of the earth, the branch of the bad human race had introduced suffering and evil. That was how the whole world was created and also why evil dominates on the earth.

Analysis

This myth bears resemblance to creation myths that place God at the helm of creation. The myth does not only explain the creation of all things, but also serves as a medium through which the Bakundu people relate with the rest of the human community with respect to their worldview and cosmology. It suggests that Bakundu believe in a supreme creator deity who is supposed to be venerated for his wisdom and all-knowingness. Finally, the myth explains the origin of the concepts of good and evil and why evil seems to dominate the world. 

Further Reading

Sprout, Barbara. Primal Myths: Creation around the World, San Francisco: Harper Collins, 1979.

Von Franz, Marie-Louise. Creation Myths, Boston: Shambhala, 1995.

Addenda

Researcher: Divine Che Neba

Research Assistant: Lenya Colle Malike 

Editor: Eleanor Anneh Dasi

Method of data collection: Tape Recording

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