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Aimée Carter

The Goddess Test (Series, Book 2): Goddess Interrupted

YEAR: 2012

COUNTRY: Canada United States of America

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Title of the work

The Goddess Test (Series, Book 2): Goddess Interrupted

Country of the First Edition

Country/countries of popularity

worldwide

Original Language

English

First Edition Date

2012

First Edition Details

Aimée Carter, The Goddess Test. Goddess Interrupted. Toronto: Harlequin Teen, 2012, 300 pp.

ISBN

9780373210459

Genre

Fantasy fiction
Mythological fiction
Novels
Romance fiction

Target Audience

Young adults

Cover

Missing cover

We are still trying to obtain permission for posting the original cover.


Author of the Entry:

Michael Stierstorfer, University of Regensburg, Michael.stierstorfer@ur.de

Peer-reviewer of the Entry:

Markus Janka, University of Munich, janka@lmu.de 

Elżbieta Olechowska, University of Warsaw, elzbieta.olechowska@gmail.com

Female portrait

Aimée Carter , b. 1986
(Author)

Aimée Carter was born on January 24, 1986, in Detroit, Michigan, where she currently resides. 

Carter graduated from the University of Michigan with a degree in Screen Arts and Cultures. She also earned a First Degree black belt in Tae Kwon Do from Progressive Martial Arts. She wrote fan fiction before publishing her first original story. Apart from romantic fantasy literature like the series The Goddess Test, and the trilogy The Blackcoat Rebellion, Carter became known for her Animox series, in which teenage characters are able to transform into powerful animals like wolves. Two last volumes of the Animox series were released only in German.


Official website (accessed: October 2, 2019)

Blog (accessed: October 2, 2019)


Bio prepared by Michael Stierstorfer, University of Regensburg, Michael.stierstorfer@ur.de


Translation

German: Aimée Carter, Die unsterbliche Braut, trans. Freya Gehrke. Hamburg: Mira, 2012.

Sequels, Prequels and Spin-offs

Prequels:

Aimée Carter, The Goddess Test, 2011

 

Sequels:

Aimée Carter, The Goddess Hunt – A Goddess Test Novella 2012

Aimée Carter, The Goddess Legacy – A Goddess Test Novella, 2012

Aimée Carter, The Goddess Inheritance, 2013

Summary

In this second volume of the Goddess Test trilogy Kate and Henry, the god of the underworld, are a couple. During spring and summer she is allowed to live in the upper world. Because of her attempt to kill Kate in the first volume, Hera is punished and banished to Tartarus, the most terrible part of the underworld. After having finished her visit to earth, Kate goes again down to the underworld accompanied by Hermes. Back at the mansion of Hades, the marriage ceremony takes place and Kate is crowned as the new empress of the underworld. But the crowning is interrupted by the Titan Cronus, who emerges as a monstrous fog and abducts the Hades-figure Henry. Then, Kate herself goes to Tartarus, where Cronus is imprisoned - his spirit is able to leave the prison for short periods of time; he used this power to abduct Henry. Kate manages to save Henry by telling Cronus that she would be on his side. Cronus nearly escapes from his prison, because the door to his cell has been opened. After all this, Kate and Henry continue with their ceremony, after which they spend their wedding night together. Soon after that, Hera and Aphrodite reveal, that Henry fell in love with Kate because Aphrodite enchanted him. The two goddesses kidnap Kate, who already carries Henry’s child, in order to rob her of the baby after the birth.

Analysis

Before the wedding, Kate tells the Pantheon that she will remain chaste until Henry marries her. After Kate heroically rescues Henry from Tartarus, they are reunited in a legitimate manner and their lawful wedding night results in a pregnancy. This turn of events could be interpreted as an approval for conservative views on sexuality and its legitimization by marriage. The negative portrayal of Aphrodite who engineers love and sexual desire at a whim and creates conflict, remains at odds with the requirements of passing the goddess test which includes all Christian virtues. Generally speaking, ideology underlying the narrative suggests superiority of stricter moral rules over the lax morals of the Olympian gods. Positive characters in the novel may stumble when their free will is under enchantments, but they improve as soon as the spells are lifted. Teenage romance as a genre may include various excesses, including moral ones, to make the narrative more intense and absorbing. Yet, such behaviour is perceived as obviously wrong and never left without a proper comment and consequence.

According to the ancient myth, Cronus is thrown into the Tartarus. In the novel, he is occasionally able to return to the surface, as a foggy and horrible creature substantial enough to kidnap people – a demonic figure from a horror movie, straight out of the cult classic movie The Fog (Carpenter 1980) or its remake (Wainwright 2005) which the author may have seen.


Further Reading

Stierstorfer, Michael. Antike Mythologie in der Kinder- und Jugendliteratur der Gegenwart. Unsterbliche Götter- und Heldengeschichten? [Ancient Mythology in Contemporary Children’s Literature. Immortal Stories of Gods and Heroes?]. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2017, 128 pp.

Zinn, Laura. "Camp Half Blood, Mount Olympus Academy & Co. – Die Inszenierung der Schule in Mythenadaptionen des 21. Jahrhunderts". Markus Janka, Michael Stierstorfer (eds.): Verjüngte Antike. Griechisch-römische Mythologie und Historie in zeitgenössischen Kinder- und Jugendmedien. Heidelberg: Winter, 2017, 99-115.

Zinn, Laura und Otmar Kampert. "Lehren, Lernen und die neu-imaginierte Antike des 21. Jahrhunderts". In: Der Altsprachliche Unterricht. Latein Griechisch, Heft 1.2017, pp. 24-35.

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Leaf pattern
Leaf pattern

Title of the work

The Goddess Test (Series, Book 2): Goddess Interrupted

Country of the First Edition

Country/countries of popularity

worldwide

Original Language

English

First Edition Date

2012

First Edition Details

Aimée Carter, The Goddess Test. Goddess Interrupted. Toronto: Harlequin Teen, 2012, 300 pp.

ISBN

9780373210459

Genre

Fantasy fiction
Mythological fiction
Novels
Romance fiction

Target Audience

Young adults

Cover

Missing cover

We are still trying to obtain permission for posting the original cover.


Author of the Entry:

Michael Stierstorfer, University of Regensburg, Michael.stierstorfer@ur.de

Peer-reviewer of the Entry:

Markus Janka, University of Munich, janka@lmu.de 

Elżbieta Olechowska, University of Warsaw, elzbieta.olechowska@gmail.com

Female portrait

Aimée Carter (Author)

Aimée Carter was born on January 24, 1986, in Detroit, Michigan, where she currently resides. 

Carter graduated from the University of Michigan with a degree in Screen Arts and Cultures. She also earned a First Degree black belt in Tae Kwon Do from Progressive Martial Arts. She wrote fan fiction before publishing her first original story. Apart from romantic fantasy literature like the series The Goddess Test, and the trilogy The Blackcoat Rebellion, Carter became known for her Animox series, in which teenage characters are able to transform into powerful animals like wolves. Two last volumes of the Animox series were released only in German.


Official website (accessed: October 2, 2019)

Blog (accessed: October 2, 2019)


Bio prepared by Michael Stierstorfer, University of Regensburg, Michael.stierstorfer@ur.de


Translation

German: Aimée Carter, Die unsterbliche Braut, trans. Freya Gehrke. Hamburg: Mira, 2012.

Sequels, Prequels and Spin-offs

Prequels:

Aimée Carter, The Goddess Test, 2011

 

Sequels:

Aimée Carter, The Goddess Hunt – A Goddess Test Novella 2012

Aimée Carter, The Goddess Legacy – A Goddess Test Novella, 2012

Aimée Carter, The Goddess Inheritance, 2013

Summary

In this second volume of the Goddess Test trilogy Kate and Henry, the god of the underworld, are a couple. During spring and summer she is allowed to live in the upper world. Because of her attempt to kill Kate in the first volume, Hera is punished and banished to Tartarus, the most terrible part of the underworld. After having finished her visit to earth, Kate goes again down to the underworld accompanied by Hermes. Back at the mansion of Hades, the marriage ceremony takes place and Kate is crowned as the new empress of the underworld. But the crowning is interrupted by the Titan Cronus, who emerges as a monstrous fog and abducts the Hades-figure Henry. Then, Kate herself goes to Tartarus, where Cronus is imprisoned - his spirit is able to leave the prison for short periods of time; he used this power to abduct Henry. Kate manages to save Henry by telling Cronus that she would be on his side. Cronus nearly escapes from his prison, because the door to his cell has been opened. After all this, Kate and Henry continue with their ceremony, after which they spend their wedding night together. Soon after that, Hera and Aphrodite reveal, that Henry fell in love with Kate because Aphrodite enchanted him. The two goddesses kidnap Kate, who already carries Henry’s child, in order to rob her of the baby after the birth.

Analysis

Before the wedding, Kate tells the Pantheon that she will remain chaste until Henry marries her. After Kate heroically rescues Henry from Tartarus, they are reunited in a legitimate manner and their lawful wedding night results in a pregnancy. This turn of events could be interpreted as an approval for conservative views on sexuality and its legitimization by marriage. The negative portrayal of Aphrodite who engineers love and sexual desire at a whim and creates conflict, remains at odds with the requirements of passing the goddess test which includes all Christian virtues. Generally speaking, ideology underlying the narrative suggests superiority of stricter moral rules over the lax morals of the Olympian gods. Positive characters in the novel may stumble when their free will is under enchantments, but they improve as soon as the spells are lifted. Teenage romance as a genre may include various excesses, including moral ones, to make the narrative more intense and absorbing. Yet, such behaviour is perceived as obviously wrong and never left without a proper comment and consequence.

According to the ancient myth, Cronus is thrown into the Tartarus. In the novel, he is occasionally able to return to the surface, as a foggy and horrible creature substantial enough to kidnap people – a demonic figure from a horror movie, straight out of the cult classic movie The Fog (Carpenter 1980) or its remake (Wainwright 2005) which the author may have seen.


Further Reading

Stierstorfer, Michael. Antike Mythologie in der Kinder- und Jugendliteratur der Gegenwart. Unsterbliche Götter- und Heldengeschichten? [Ancient Mythology in Contemporary Children’s Literature. Immortal Stories of Gods and Heroes?]. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2017, 128 pp.

Zinn, Laura. "Camp Half Blood, Mount Olympus Academy & Co. – Die Inszenierung der Schule in Mythenadaptionen des 21. Jahrhunderts". Markus Janka, Michael Stierstorfer (eds.): Verjüngte Antike. Griechisch-römische Mythologie und Historie in zeitgenössischen Kinder- und Jugendmedien. Heidelberg: Winter, 2017, 99-115.

Zinn, Laura und Otmar Kampert. "Lehren, Lernen und die neu-imaginierte Antike des 21. Jahrhunderts". In: Der Altsprachliche Unterricht. Latein Griechisch, Heft 1.2017, pp. 24-35.

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