arrow_upward

Kalliope Kyrdi , Evi Pini

Glafki at the Athenian Agora. Short Museum Guides [Με τη Γλαύκη στην Αρχαία Αγορά της Αθήνας]

YEAR: 2010

COUNTRY: Greece

Cateogry icon

Title of the work

Glafki at the Athenian Agora. Short Museum Guides [Με τη Γλαύκη στην Αρχαία Αγορά της Αθήνας]

Country of the First Edition

Original Language

Greek

First Edition Date

2010

First Edition Details

Evi Pini & Kalliopi Kyrdi, Glafki at the Athenian Agora. Short Museum Guides [Με τη Γλαύκη στην Αρχαία Αγορά της Αθήνας]. Trans. from Greek by Olympia Theofanolpoulou. Athens: Papadopoulos Publishing, 2010, 64 pp.

ISBN

9789604840946

Genre

Illustrated works
Instructional and educational work
Puzzles and games

Target Audience

Children (6+)

Cover

Missing cover

We are still trying to obtain permission for posting the original cover.


Author of the Entry:

Katerina Volioti, University of Roehampton, Katerina.Volioti@roehampton.ac.uk

Peer-reviewer of the Entry:

Susan Deacy, University of Roehampton, s.deacy@roehampton.ac.uk

Elżbieta Olechowska, University of Warsaw, elzbieta.olechowska@gmail.com 

Female portrait

Kalliope Kyrdi (Author)

Kalliope Kyrdi studied Law and Pedagogy at the University of Athens, and has worked in primary school education. Kyrdi has been responsible for cultural matters in the 1st Directorate of Primary Education, Athens, since 2007.


Source:

Profile at the epbooks.gr (accessed: June 27, 2018).


Bio prepared by Katerina Volioti, University of Roehampton, Katerina.Volioti@roehampton.ac.uk


Female portrait

Evi Pini (Author)

Athens-born Evi Pini studied Archaeology at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. Pini has been working for the Greek Ministry of Culture since 1990, specialising in children’s educational programmes.


Information about the Author, see here (accessed: June 26, 2018).


Bio prepared by Katerina Volioti, University of Roehampton, Katerina.Volioti@roehampton.ac.uk


Summary

The opening page, entitled “instead of a preface,” explains that the book is about an explorative journey to the past, for which teachers and parents can prepare children before visiting the Agora. A talking bird will guide children throughout the book. Appropriately for Athens, the bird is an owl called “Glafki”, and we are given information about an owl’s symbolism in ancient Greece and about owls nesting in the Acropolis today. An illustration with a reconstructed view of the Agora from the 2nd century AD with buildings from different periods is helpful since any visitor to the Agora encounters many layers of ancient buildings.  

To help with gap-filling, Glafki gives us a chronological timeframe, from Neolithic times to the end of the Classical period. The stress is in the 5th century BCE, for which Glafki offers more dates of historical “landmarks” that affected Classical Athens. Children’s learning about the Agora starts with daily-life events, rather than with the affairs of the state. The workings of democracy feature later on in the book. Children are asked to observe a black-figured vase scene from a blacksmith’s workshop and imagine that such a workshop operated in Classical Agora.

As children enter the Museum, the objectives of their exploratory journey change. 

Rather than going back in time and envisaging ancient people’s interactions with one another and with the Agora’s physical and built environment, children now need to observe small finds. Glafki takes us to showcases with ceramic finds, and children pay attention to a red-figured kylix and a black-figured fragmentary krater. The latter, a masterpiece by Exekias showing Herakles’ procession to Olympos and name inscriptions for gods, offers an opportunity for a brief reference to mythology.

The aftermath of the visit is a number of interactive activities, including the making of ancient objects using plasticine, clay, and cans, which children can complete “at home and at school." At the very end, children are asked to practice their creative writing skills by describing what they would see if they were at the Agora one morning in antiquity. Once again, we have a journey back in time and space. The book closes with answers to the questions on previous pages, and this is much needed as some exercises may be difficult for very young children. On the last page, we have Glafki’s reading list, which features works by Anglophone scholars, as well as details about the book’s illustrations.

Analysis

The Athenian Agora is a large archaeological site with a museum housed in the Stoa of Attalos. This is the only guide in the series that has been translated into English so far, perhaps targeting American visitors to the Agora. There is a strong link between the Agora and the American School of Classical Studies in Athens. The American excavations of the Agora commenced in 1931*. The book’s content is exceptionally rich, offering historical and archaeological information, illustrations (and reconstructions) of artifacts and buildings, and exercises that help with children’s learning. The three illustrators have done a superb job with their accurate drawings of artworks and buildings.  

In line with the book’s objective to make children appreciate ancient experience(s), the emphasis is on what people’s frequentation of Classical Agora entailed. Children are encouraged to think about who visited the Agora (mostly males), what people saw in terms of buildings and trees, and the range of activities that happened there (including religious processions). 

Subsequent pages are more heavily laden with material about public buildings, monuments, and democratic institutions, and the level of knowledge acquisition here is relatively high. Children will need to apply this knowledge in deciding who can hold office from reading 5 senators’ statements. The senators’ garments here may recall those of Roman officials, especially as known from Hollywood films. There will be more on magistrates and voting in the book, once children visit the Museum of the Athenian Agora. Prior to that, and presumably, while children are still in the archaeological site, there is a presentation of the Hephaisteion, which is shown in reconstruction, and of the gods Hephaistos and Athena Ergane. Mythological context is not provided here. The description of the stoas entails accurate information about their function and appearance, ancient and modern. 

Inside the museum, the scale of analysis is different. Details such as writing and imagery on portable metal objects (weights, coins, and juror’s tags and ballots) pertain to commercial and political functions at the Agora and beyond. The additional information given here is extremely useful to readers of any age. It is explained, for example, that the drachma was a strong currency that enabled trade throughout the Mediterranean. Children will learn about politics in practice, that is, in terms of material objects, by studying water clocks, clay bottles for poison (which Socrates was sentenced to drink), and ostraca inscribed with magistrates’ names. The mention of “recycling” in connection with potsherds used for voting and writing is commendable, reflecting contemporary environmental concerns. 



* For the American excavations in the Athenian Agora, see agathe.gr (accessed: August 2, 2018).

For the Agora volumes (published from 1953 onwards), offering total publication and used widely in scholarship as guides for identifying and dating similar finds from other excavations, see ascsa.edu.gr (accessed: August 2, 2018).


Further Reading

Information about the book at epbooks.gr, published 15 September 2010 (accessed: August 2, 2018).

Addenda

Published in English (translated from Greek by Olympia Theofanolpoulou).

Illustrations by St. Bonatsos; G. Dalagiorgou – I. Sarsakis.

Yellow cloud
Leaf pattern
Leaf pattern

Title of the work

Glafki at the Athenian Agora. Short Museum Guides [Με τη Γλαύκη στην Αρχαία Αγορά της Αθήνας]

Country of the First Edition

Original Language

Greek

First Edition Date

2010

First Edition Details

Evi Pini & Kalliopi Kyrdi, Glafki at the Athenian Agora. Short Museum Guides [Με τη Γλαύκη στην Αρχαία Αγορά της Αθήνας]. Trans. from Greek by Olympia Theofanolpoulou. Athens: Papadopoulos Publishing, 2010, 64 pp.

ISBN

9789604840946

Genre

Illustrated works
Instructional and educational work
Puzzles and games

Target Audience

Children (6+)

Cover

Missing cover

We are still trying to obtain permission for posting the original cover.


Author of the Entry:

Katerina Volioti, University of Roehampton, Katerina.Volioti@roehampton.ac.uk

Peer-reviewer of the Entry:

Susan Deacy, University of Roehampton, s.deacy@roehampton.ac.uk

Elżbieta Olechowska, University of Warsaw, elzbieta.olechowska@gmail.com 

Female portrait

Kalliope Kyrdi (Author)

Kalliope Kyrdi studied Law and Pedagogy at the University of Athens, and has worked in primary school education. Kyrdi has been responsible for cultural matters in the 1st Directorate of Primary Education, Athens, since 2007.


Source:

Profile at the epbooks.gr (accessed: June 27, 2018).


Bio prepared by Katerina Volioti, University of Roehampton, Katerina.Volioti@roehampton.ac.uk


Female portrait

Evi Pini (Author)

Athens-born Evi Pini studied Archaeology at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. Pini has been working for the Greek Ministry of Culture since 1990, specialising in children’s educational programmes.


Information about the Author, see here (accessed: June 26, 2018).


Bio prepared by Katerina Volioti, University of Roehampton, Katerina.Volioti@roehampton.ac.uk


Summary

The opening page, entitled “instead of a preface,” explains that the book is about an explorative journey to the past, for which teachers and parents can prepare children before visiting the Agora. A talking bird will guide children throughout the book. Appropriately for Athens, the bird is an owl called “Glafki”, and we are given information about an owl’s symbolism in ancient Greece and about owls nesting in the Acropolis today. An illustration with a reconstructed view of the Agora from the 2nd century AD with buildings from different periods is helpful since any visitor to the Agora encounters many layers of ancient buildings.  

To help with gap-filling, Glafki gives us a chronological timeframe, from Neolithic times to the end of the Classical period. The stress is in the 5th century BCE, for which Glafki offers more dates of historical “landmarks” that affected Classical Athens. Children’s learning about the Agora starts with daily-life events, rather than with the affairs of the state. The workings of democracy feature later on in the book. Children are asked to observe a black-figured vase scene from a blacksmith’s workshop and imagine that such a workshop operated in Classical Agora.

As children enter the Museum, the objectives of their exploratory journey change. 

Rather than going back in time and envisaging ancient people’s interactions with one another and with the Agora’s physical and built environment, children now need to observe small finds. Glafki takes us to showcases with ceramic finds, and children pay attention to a red-figured kylix and a black-figured fragmentary krater. The latter, a masterpiece by Exekias showing Herakles’ procession to Olympos and name inscriptions for gods, offers an opportunity for a brief reference to mythology.

The aftermath of the visit is a number of interactive activities, including the making of ancient objects using plasticine, clay, and cans, which children can complete “at home and at school." At the very end, children are asked to practice their creative writing skills by describing what they would see if they were at the Agora one morning in antiquity. Once again, we have a journey back in time and space. The book closes with answers to the questions on previous pages, and this is much needed as some exercises may be difficult for very young children. On the last page, we have Glafki’s reading list, which features works by Anglophone scholars, as well as details about the book’s illustrations.

Analysis

The Athenian Agora is a large archaeological site with a museum housed in the Stoa of Attalos. This is the only guide in the series that has been translated into English so far, perhaps targeting American visitors to the Agora. There is a strong link between the Agora and the American School of Classical Studies in Athens. The American excavations of the Agora commenced in 1931*. The book’s content is exceptionally rich, offering historical and archaeological information, illustrations (and reconstructions) of artifacts and buildings, and exercises that help with children’s learning. The three illustrators have done a superb job with their accurate drawings of artworks and buildings.  

In line with the book’s objective to make children appreciate ancient experience(s), the emphasis is on what people’s frequentation of Classical Agora entailed. Children are encouraged to think about who visited the Agora (mostly males), what people saw in terms of buildings and trees, and the range of activities that happened there (including religious processions). 

Subsequent pages are more heavily laden with material about public buildings, monuments, and democratic institutions, and the level of knowledge acquisition here is relatively high. Children will need to apply this knowledge in deciding who can hold office from reading 5 senators’ statements. The senators’ garments here may recall those of Roman officials, especially as known from Hollywood films. There will be more on magistrates and voting in the book, once children visit the Museum of the Athenian Agora. Prior to that, and presumably, while children are still in the archaeological site, there is a presentation of the Hephaisteion, which is shown in reconstruction, and of the gods Hephaistos and Athena Ergane. Mythological context is not provided here. The description of the stoas entails accurate information about their function and appearance, ancient and modern. 

Inside the museum, the scale of analysis is different. Details such as writing and imagery on portable metal objects (weights, coins, and juror’s tags and ballots) pertain to commercial and political functions at the Agora and beyond. The additional information given here is extremely useful to readers of any age. It is explained, for example, that the drachma was a strong currency that enabled trade throughout the Mediterranean. Children will learn about politics in practice, that is, in terms of material objects, by studying water clocks, clay bottles for poison (which Socrates was sentenced to drink), and ostraca inscribed with magistrates’ names. The mention of “recycling” in connection with potsherds used for voting and writing is commendable, reflecting contemporary environmental concerns. 



* For the American excavations in the Athenian Agora, see agathe.gr (accessed: August 2, 2018).

For the Agora volumes (published from 1953 onwards), offering total publication and used widely in scholarship as guides for identifying and dating similar finds from other excavations, see ascsa.edu.gr (accessed: August 2, 2018).


Further Reading

Information about the book at epbooks.gr, published 15 September 2010 (accessed: August 2, 2018).

Addenda

Published in English (translated from Greek by Olympia Theofanolpoulou).

Illustrations by St. Bonatsos; G. Dalagiorgou – I. Sarsakis.

Yellow cloud