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Estudio Haus , Blake Hoena

The 12 Labors of Hercules: A Graphic Retelling

YEAR: 2015

COUNTRY: United States of America

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Title of the work

The 12 Labors of Hercules: A Graphic Retelling

Country of the First Edition

Country/countries of popularity

United States

Original Language

English

First Edition Date

2015

First Edition Details

Blake Hoena and Estudio Haus, The 12 Labors of Hercules: a Graphic Retelling. North Makato, Minnesota: Capstone Press, 2015, 32 pp.

ISBN

9781491422755

Genre

Graphic novels
Instructional and educational work
Mythological fiction
Myths

Target Audience

Children (Children ages 8-14)

Cover

Missing cover

We are still trying to obtain permission for posting the original cover.


Author of the Entry:

Ayelet Peer, Bar Ilan University, ayelet.peer@gmail.com

Peer-reviewer of the Entry:

Lisa Maurice, Bar Ilan University mautil68@gmail.com
Susan Deacy, University of Roehampton, s.deacy@roehampton.ac.uk

Male portrait

Estudio Haus (Illustrator)

Estudio Haus is the name of a group of illustrators established in 1997 from Buenos Aires. They specialise in comic and illustration. Their work has been published worldwide. Estudio Haus run their own school of art and organize many conferences and exhibitions, including the biggest Latin American comic-book convention.


Sources:

Profile at the directoryofillustration.com (accessed: July 6, 2018).

Profile at the capstonepub.com (accessed: July 6, 2018).


Bio prepared by Ayelet Peer, Bar Ilan University, ayelet.peer@gmail.com


Male portrait

Blake Hoena (Author)

Hoena is an American writer originally from Wisconsin. He holds a Masters of Fine Arts degree in Creative Writing from Minnesota State University, Mankato. He has written more than 50 books for children, among them Everything Mythology, Odysseus, Perseus and Medusa and many more on various subjects, from football to dinosaurs.


Sources: 

Official website (accessed: July 2, 2018).

Profile at the goodreads.com (accessed: July 2, 2018).


Bio prepared by Ayelet Peer, Bar Ilan University, ayelet.peer@gmail.com


Summary

This is a graphic novel retelling of the myth of Hercules. It opens with Hercules as a grown man, ordered to serve king Eurystheus and it ends with Hercules being turn into a constellation of stars. The novel contains notes titled “ancient facts” and also a glossary, a further reading and websites and an index. 

The reason behind the labours is briefly stated at the beginning (4): in her jealousy, Hera drove Hercules mad with rage. In his madness, Hercules killed his wife and children in a fire. As a result, Hercules receives his labors, which are then retold.

After the 10th labor, the king tells Hercules he is not pardoned yet because he was helped by others during the labors (Iolus assisted him with the Hydra and the rivers washed the stable) and therefore he has to perform more tasks. At the end is it mentioned that Hercules joined the Argonauts and that he was finally lifted by Zeus to Olympus where he married Hebe.

Analysis

This book is aimed at young readership and also has didactic aims in explaining the story, therefore it also contains explanations and glossary. While the ancient facts explain different parts of the stories, it also offers an interesting observation. On p.18 there is an explanation about Ares and how he is different from Mars: Ares…wasn’t an important god to ancient Greeks, but because ancient Romans valued conquest, Mars was one of their most powerful gods. This short remark offers a cultural comparison to the young readers and gives them further insight into the ancient world. It also passes (perhaps unintentionally) a moral judgment on the ancient Roman vs. Greek society with regard to war. 

Some changes have been made to suit the tale for this age group. While Hercules kills his family, a fire is a remoter way than killing them by his own hands. The fight with the amazons accentuates the sentiments of mutual mistrust and betrayals (due to the machinations of Hera), and in the end it is narrated that Hercules killed Hippolyta. In another adaptation of the myth for the young readership, the author avoids any mention of Deianeira since her part of the story also involves jealousy, betrayal and the death of Hercules. Thus Hercules and the young readers receive their happy ending when Hercules marries Hebe on Olympus. 

The book also had a content consultant, Laurel Bowman, from the department of Greek and Roman studies form the University of Victoria, Canada. This demonstrates the author and the publisher’s desire to be as accurate as possible, although some details were left out sue to the age group of the readers. There is also a note at the beginning which indicates that the adaption is based on The Library by Apollodorus. This also exhibits the seriousness the people in charge treated the book and the source material. An interesting choice by the illustrators is made with the capture of the Erymanthian boar (13). Hercules carries it over his shoulders and the King is hiding in a large vase; very similar to the ancient vase painting of this episode, reflecting the research that the illustrators put into their work.

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Leaf pattern
Leaf pattern

Title of the work

The 12 Labors of Hercules: A Graphic Retelling

Country of the First Edition

Country/countries of popularity

United States

Original Language

English

First Edition Date

2015

First Edition Details

Blake Hoena and Estudio Haus, The 12 Labors of Hercules: a Graphic Retelling. North Makato, Minnesota: Capstone Press, 2015, 32 pp.

ISBN

9781491422755

Genre

Graphic novels
Instructional and educational work
Mythological fiction
Myths

Target Audience

Children (Children ages 8-14)

Cover

Missing cover

We are still trying to obtain permission for posting the original cover.


Author of the Entry:

Ayelet Peer, Bar Ilan University, ayelet.peer@gmail.com

Peer-reviewer of the Entry:

Lisa Maurice, Bar Ilan University mautil68@gmail.com
Susan Deacy, University of Roehampton, s.deacy@roehampton.ac.uk

Male portrait

Estudio Haus (Illustrator)

Estudio Haus is the name of a group of illustrators established in 1997 from Buenos Aires. They specialise in comic and illustration. Their work has been published worldwide. Estudio Haus run their own school of art and organize many conferences and exhibitions, including the biggest Latin American comic-book convention.


Sources:

Profile at the directoryofillustration.com (accessed: July 6, 2018).

Profile at the capstonepub.com (accessed: July 6, 2018).


Bio prepared by Ayelet Peer, Bar Ilan University, ayelet.peer@gmail.com


Male portrait

Blake Hoena (Author)

Hoena is an American writer originally from Wisconsin. He holds a Masters of Fine Arts degree in Creative Writing from Minnesota State University, Mankato. He has written more than 50 books for children, among them Everything Mythology, Odysseus, Perseus and Medusa and many more on various subjects, from football to dinosaurs.


Sources: 

Official website (accessed: July 2, 2018).

Profile at the goodreads.com (accessed: July 2, 2018).


Bio prepared by Ayelet Peer, Bar Ilan University, ayelet.peer@gmail.com


Summary

This is a graphic novel retelling of the myth of Hercules. It opens with Hercules as a grown man, ordered to serve king Eurystheus and it ends with Hercules being turn into a constellation of stars. The novel contains notes titled “ancient facts” and also a glossary, a further reading and websites and an index. 

The reason behind the labours is briefly stated at the beginning (4): in her jealousy, Hera drove Hercules mad with rage. In his madness, Hercules killed his wife and children in a fire. As a result, Hercules receives his labors, which are then retold.

After the 10th labor, the king tells Hercules he is not pardoned yet because he was helped by others during the labors (Iolus assisted him with the Hydra and the rivers washed the stable) and therefore he has to perform more tasks. At the end is it mentioned that Hercules joined the Argonauts and that he was finally lifted by Zeus to Olympus where he married Hebe.

Analysis

This book is aimed at young readership and also has didactic aims in explaining the story, therefore it also contains explanations and glossary. While the ancient facts explain different parts of the stories, it also offers an interesting observation. On p.18 there is an explanation about Ares and how he is different from Mars: Ares…wasn’t an important god to ancient Greeks, but because ancient Romans valued conquest, Mars was one of their most powerful gods. This short remark offers a cultural comparison to the young readers and gives them further insight into the ancient world. It also passes (perhaps unintentionally) a moral judgment on the ancient Roman vs. Greek society with regard to war. 

Some changes have been made to suit the tale for this age group. While Hercules kills his family, a fire is a remoter way than killing them by his own hands. The fight with the amazons accentuates the sentiments of mutual mistrust and betrayals (due to the machinations of Hera), and in the end it is narrated that Hercules killed Hippolyta. In another adaptation of the myth for the young readership, the author avoids any mention of Deianeira since her part of the story also involves jealousy, betrayal and the death of Hercules. Thus Hercules and the young readers receive their happy ending when Hercules marries Hebe on Olympus. 

The book also had a content consultant, Laurel Bowman, from the department of Greek and Roman studies form the University of Victoria, Canada. This demonstrates the author and the publisher’s desire to be as accurate as possible, although some details were left out sue to the age group of the readers. There is also a note at the beginning which indicates that the adaption is based on The Library by Apollodorus. This also exhibits the seriousness the people in charge treated the book and the source material. An interesting choice by the illustrators is made with the capture of the Erymanthian boar (13). Hercules carries it over his shoulders and the King is hiding in a large vase; very similar to the ancient vase painting of this episode, reflecting the research that the illustrators put into their work.

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