arrow_upward

Mark Bergin , Peter Hepplewhite , David Salariya

Ancient Greek Myths (Series): The Adventures of Perseus

YEAR: 2004

COUNTRY: United Kingdom

Cateogry icon

Title of the work

Ancient Greek Myths (Series): The Adventures of Perseus

Country of the First Edition

Country/countries of popularity

United Kingdom

Original Language

English

First Edition Date

2004

First Edition Details

Peter Hepplewhite, ill. Mark Bergin, created and designed by David Salariya, The Adventures of Perseus. Brighton: Salariya Book Company Book House, 2004, 32 pp.

ISBN

1 904642-26-8

Genre

Illustrated works
Myths
Picture books

Target Audience

Children

Cover

Courtesy of The Salariya Book Company.


Author of the Entry:

Viktoryia Bartsevich, University of Warsaw, v.bartsevich@student.uw.edu.pl

Peer-reviewer of the Entry:

Elżbieta Olechowska, University of Warsaw, elzbieta.olechowska@gmail.com 

Lisa Maurice, Bar Ilan University, mauril8@gmail.com

Male portrait

Mark Bergin , b. 1961
(Illustrator)

Mark Bergin was born in Hastings, England. He studied at Eastbourne College of Art. He works as an illustrator of children’s books: The Voyages of Odysseus written by Sue Reid, Gods and Goddesses in the Daily Life of the Vikings written by Jen Green, Going to War in Ancient Greece written by Adrian Gilbert, Going to the War in Ancient Egypt written by Anne Millard, An Ancient Greek Temple: The Story of the Building of the Temple in Ancient Greece written by J. Malam and others.


Sources:

The cover of the book The Adventures of Perseus.

Profile at the biography.jrank.org (accessed: July 4, 2018).


Bio prepared by Viktoryia Bartsevich, University of Warsaw, v.bartsevich@student.uw.edu.pl


Male portrait

Peter Hepplewhite , b. 1954
(Author)

Peter Hepplewhite was born in Hartlepool, England. He is a British author and former history teacher who works as an education officer at Tyne and Wear Archive Services. He wrote two books in the series A World in Flames, about World War II. Peter Hepplewhite is best known for The Awesome Egyptians in the series Horrible Histories. He has written many historical books for children: The Fact or Fiction Behind the Victorians (Truth or Busted), The Fact or Fiction Behind the Romans (Truth or Busted), Hometown History Newcastle, The History Detective Investigates: Tudor Exploration and others.


Bio prepared by Elżbieta Olechowska, University of Warsaw, elzbieta.olechowska@gmail.com


Male portrait

David Salariya , b. 1954
(Illustrator)

David Salariya was born in 1954 in Dundee, Scotland. He is the founder of Salariya Book Company. David Salariya is an illustrator. His first illustration was done for Reader’s Digest.


Source:

Interview at the creativeinterviews.com (accessed: April 17, 2018).

Interview at the childrensillustrators.com (accessed: April 17, 2018).


Bio prepared by Elżbieta Olechowska, University of Warsaw, elzbieta.olechowska@gmail.com, and  Viktoryia Bartsevich, University of Warsaw, v.bartsevich@student.uw.edu.pl


Translation

Polish version: Janusz Ochab, trans. Warszawa: Firma Księgarska Jacek i Krzysztof Olesiejuk Inwestycje, 2006.

Summary

The story begins from the birth of Perseus, from the prophecy of the death of King Acrisius of Argos by the hand of his daughter Danae’s son. Zeus falls on Danae in the form of a golden shower and their son Perseus is born. Acrisius puts his daughter and grandson into a wooden chest and throws them to the sea. The unfortunate pair are rescued by Zeus, Poseidon, and the fisherman Dictys. The King of Seriphos, Polydectes, brother of Dictys, falls in love with Perseus's mother. He asks Perseus to bring him Medusa's head as a wedding gift, the goddess Athena and the god Hermes help him to complete this task. Perseus sets out to see the three Graeae Sisters who knew the way to Medusa. Arriving at the place, the hero, armed with an adamantine sword, a polished shield, winged sandals, and the cap of invisibility, kills the monster. Coming back home, Perseus escapes pursuit by the Gorgons and visits Atlas, King of Mauretania who refuses him hospitality; Perseus turns him to stone. He saves his future wife, Andromeda, from Cepheus, the sea monster, sent by Poseidon, and then using Medusa's magical head, he rescues his mother who had to seek refuge in a temple from King Polydectes – who meets the same fate as Atlas. The myth ends with the same story with which it began, the prophecy - King Acrisius is accidentally killed during games in Larissa by Perseus throwing a discus.

There are additional themes in the story, including: the role of Zeus, the three Graeae Sisters, Medusa, what happened to Medusa's head, why Andromeda's parents were willing to sacrifice their daughter's life and more.

Analysis

Like every book in the series "Ancient Greek Myths," The Adventures of Perseus is very well composed. The text is written in an accessible way, the illustrations are colorful and complement the text. The myth that is conveyed by the creators, does not bring any new elements; it has the usual, all-known form and content. The negative aspects of the myth are shown in the illustrations without causing fear, the monsters are not presented as monsters, but as different creatures. The publication ends with a hand-held glossary that explains to the young reader who was who in a given myth. The book also contains an index, which gives the number of pages, on which there is information about the interesting characters from the myth. It is a typical retelling of myth for children increasing their awareness of Greek mythology and serving as a didactic aid.


Yellow cloud
Leaf pattern
Leaf pattern

Title of the work

Ancient Greek Myths (Series): The Adventures of Perseus

Country of the First Edition

Country/countries of popularity

United Kingdom

Original Language

English

First Edition Date

2004

First Edition Details

Peter Hepplewhite, ill. Mark Bergin, created and designed by David Salariya, The Adventures of Perseus. Brighton: Salariya Book Company Book House, 2004, 32 pp.

ISBN

1 904642-26-8

Genre

Illustrated works
Myths
Picture books

Target Audience

Children

Cover

Courtesy of The Salariya Book Company.


Author of the Entry:

Viktoryia Bartsevich, University of Warsaw, v.bartsevich@student.uw.edu.pl

Peer-reviewer of the Entry:

Elżbieta Olechowska, University of Warsaw, elzbieta.olechowska@gmail.com 

Lisa Maurice, Bar Ilan University, mauril8@gmail.com

Male portrait

Mark Bergin (Illustrator)

Mark Bergin was born in Hastings, England. He studied at Eastbourne College of Art. He works as an illustrator of children’s books: The Voyages of Odysseus written by Sue Reid, Gods and Goddesses in the Daily Life of the Vikings written by Jen Green, Going to War in Ancient Greece written by Adrian Gilbert, Going to the War in Ancient Egypt written by Anne Millard, An Ancient Greek Temple: The Story of the Building of the Temple in Ancient Greece written by J. Malam and others.


Sources:

The cover of the book The Adventures of Perseus.

Profile at the biography.jrank.org (accessed: July 4, 2018).


Bio prepared by Viktoryia Bartsevich, University of Warsaw, v.bartsevich@student.uw.edu.pl


Male portrait

Peter Hepplewhite (Author)

Peter Hepplewhite was born in Hartlepool, England. He is a British author and former history teacher who works as an education officer at Tyne and Wear Archive Services. He wrote two books in the series A World in Flames, about World War II. Peter Hepplewhite is best known for The Awesome Egyptians in the series Horrible Histories. He has written many historical books for children: The Fact or Fiction Behind the Victorians (Truth or Busted), The Fact or Fiction Behind the Romans (Truth or Busted), Hometown History Newcastle, The History Detective Investigates: Tudor Exploration and others.


Bio prepared by Elżbieta Olechowska, University of Warsaw, elzbieta.olechowska@gmail.com


Male portrait

David Salariya (Illustrator)

David Salariya was born in 1954 in Dundee, Scotland. He is the founder of Salariya Book Company. David Salariya is an illustrator. His first illustration was done for Reader’s Digest.


Source:

Interview at the creativeinterviews.com (accessed: April 17, 2018).

Interview at the childrensillustrators.com (accessed: April 17, 2018).


Bio prepared by Elżbieta Olechowska, University of Warsaw, elzbieta.olechowska@gmail.com, and  Viktoryia Bartsevich, University of Warsaw, v.bartsevich@student.uw.edu.pl


Translation

Polish version: Janusz Ochab, trans. Warszawa: Firma Księgarska Jacek i Krzysztof Olesiejuk Inwestycje, 2006.

Summary

The story begins from the birth of Perseus, from the prophecy of the death of King Acrisius of Argos by the hand of his daughter Danae’s son. Zeus falls on Danae in the form of a golden shower and their son Perseus is born. Acrisius puts his daughter and grandson into a wooden chest and throws them to the sea. The unfortunate pair are rescued by Zeus, Poseidon, and the fisherman Dictys. The King of Seriphos, Polydectes, brother of Dictys, falls in love with Perseus's mother. He asks Perseus to bring him Medusa's head as a wedding gift, the goddess Athena and the god Hermes help him to complete this task. Perseus sets out to see the three Graeae Sisters who knew the way to Medusa. Arriving at the place, the hero, armed with an adamantine sword, a polished shield, winged sandals, and the cap of invisibility, kills the monster. Coming back home, Perseus escapes pursuit by the Gorgons and visits Atlas, King of Mauretania who refuses him hospitality; Perseus turns him to stone. He saves his future wife, Andromeda, from Cepheus, the sea monster, sent by Poseidon, and then using Medusa's magical head, he rescues his mother who had to seek refuge in a temple from King Polydectes – who meets the same fate as Atlas. The myth ends with the same story with which it began, the prophecy - King Acrisius is accidentally killed during games in Larissa by Perseus throwing a discus.

There are additional themes in the story, including: the role of Zeus, the three Graeae Sisters, Medusa, what happened to Medusa's head, why Andromeda's parents were willing to sacrifice their daughter's life and more.

Analysis

Like every book in the series "Ancient Greek Myths," The Adventures of Perseus is very well composed. The text is written in an accessible way, the illustrations are colorful and complement the text. The myth that is conveyed by the creators, does not bring any new elements; it has the usual, all-known form and content. The negative aspects of the myth are shown in the illustrations without causing fear, the monsters are not presented as monsters, but as different creatures. The publication ends with a hand-held glossary that explains to the young reader who was who in a given myth. The book also contains an index, which gives the number of pages, on which there is information about the interesting characters from the myth. It is a typical retelling of myth for children increasing their awareness of Greek mythology and serving as a didactic aid.


Yellow cloud