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Steve Kurth , Barbara Schulz , Paul D. Storrie

Hercules: The Twelve Labors

YEAR: 2007

COUNTRY: United States of America

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Title of the work

Hercules: The Twelve Labors

Country of the First Edition

Country/countries of popularity

United States

Original Language

English

First Edition Date

2007

First Edition Details

Paul D. Storrie and Steve Kurth, Hercules: the Twelve Labors: a Greek myth (Graphic myths and legends). Minneapolis, Minn. 2007, 48 pp.

ISBN

9780822530848

Genre

Comics (Graphic works)
Mythological comics
Myths

Target Audience

Children (Children, grade 5 and up )

Cover

Picture courtesy of ©Graphic Universe, an imprint of Lerner Publishing Group.


Author of the Entry:

Ayelet Peer, Bar Ilan University, ayelet.peer@gmail.com

Peer-reviewer of the Entry:

Lisa Maurice, Bar Ilan University, mautil68@gmail.com

Susan Deacy, University of Roehampton, s.deacy@roehampton.ac.uk 

Male portrait

Steve Kurth (Illustrator)

Kurth is an American artist of various comic books. He has worked on Iron Man, X-Men, Transformers, Green Arrow, and The Walking Dead, for Marvel Comics, IDW Publishing, Image Comics, and Skybound Entertainment. He graduated from the University of Wisconsin and holds a B.A. in fine arts and illustration.


Source:

Profile at the comicvine.gamespot.com (accessed: June 28, 2018).


Bio prepared by Ayelet Peer, Bar Ilan University, ayelet.peer@gmail.com, and Sonya Nevin, University of Roehampton, sonya.nevin@roehampton.ac.uk


Female portrait

Barbara Schulz (Illustrator)

Schulz is a professional comic artist. She is also a professor of comic art at the University of Wisconsin-Superior, MA, and lecturer at Minneapolis College of Art and Design, where she helped to establish and now runs the comic art degree programme. She has been working professionally in comics since 1991. Schulz created comic book art for DC, Dark Horse, Image, and Devils Due comics as well as illustrating numerous graphic novels.


Sources: 

Profile at the mcad.edu (accessed: March 8, 2018).

Profile at the cargocollective.com (accessed: March 8, 2018).


Bio prepared by Ayelet Peer, Bar Ilan University, ayelet.peer@gmail.com, and Sonya Nevin, University of Roehampton, sonya.nevin@roehampton.ac.uk


Male portrait

Paul D. Storrie (Author)

Storrie is a graphic novel author from Detroit. He worked for Caliber comics, DC comics, Marvel among others. Among his comic books are Perseus: The Hunt for Medusa's Head: A Greek Myth, Beowulf: Monster Slayer a British Legend, Yu the Great: Conquering the Flood and many more.


Sources:

Author's website (accessed: June 24, 2018).

Interview with the Author (accessed: June 24, 2018).


Bio prepared by Ayelet Peer, Bar Ilan University, ayelet.peer@gmail.com


Summary

This is a graphic novel retelling of the myth of Hercules from his youth to after the labours. It includes glossary, index and further reading. There are only 4 panels devoted to Hercules’ youth and then we are told that as a grown man Hercules was told by the oracle of Delphi (which was manipulated by Hera) to serve King Eurystheus. Unsurprisingly, there is no mention of the murders he committed, this being a children’s story. All the 12 labours are then portrayed and we also meet people Hercules helps along the way. Hera keeps intervening, even causing a fight between Hercules and the Amazons. The book ends with the note that (45) all his life Hercules never stopped making dangerous journeys and fighting against fearsome enemies, but those are stories for another time as if to leave the young readers curious about more of Hercules’ tales.

Analysis

According to the back of the book, the author relied on Thomas Bulfinch’s The Age of Fable and on Hamilton’s Mythology. The illustrator, it is stated, was influenced by classical Greek art. Towards the end, Hercules contemplates (33) again I am a thief for Eurystheus. I like it less every time. This is a rare glimpse into Hercules’ psyche, since his character is elsewhere not developed. He is more of the stereotypical muscle man. No definite reason is given for the labours since the murder of Hercules’ family by his own hand is missing. Therefore the labours could be seen as a pretext to exhibit Hercules’ muscles and super human strength as he is fighting different rivals.


Addenda

Illustrators: Steve Kurth (pencils), Barbara Schulz (ink).

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Leaf pattern
Leaf pattern

Title of the work

Hercules: The Twelve Labors

Country of the First Edition

Country/countries of popularity

United States

Original Language

English

First Edition Date

2007

First Edition Details

Paul D. Storrie and Steve Kurth, Hercules: the Twelve Labors: a Greek myth (Graphic myths and legends). Minneapolis, Minn. 2007, 48 pp.

ISBN

9780822530848

Genre

Comics (Graphic works)
Mythological comics
Myths

Target Audience

Children (Children, grade 5 and up )

Cover

Picture courtesy of ©Graphic Universe, an imprint of Lerner Publishing Group.


Author of the Entry:

Ayelet Peer, Bar Ilan University, ayelet.peer@gmail.com

Peer-reviewer of the Entry:

Lisa Maurice, Bar Ilan University, mautil68@gmail.com

Susan Deacy, University of Roehampton, s.deacy@roehampton.ac.uk 

Male portrait

Steve Kurth (Illustrator)

Kurth is an American artist of various comic books. He has worked on Iron Man, X-Men, Transformers, Green Arrow, and The Walking Dead, for Marvel Comics, IDW Publishing, Image Comics, and Skybound Entertainment. He graduated from the University of Wisconsin and holds a B.A. in fine arts and illustration.


Source:

Profile at the comicvine.gamespot.com (accessed: June 28, 2018).


Bio prepared by Ayelet Peer, Bar Ilan University, ayelet.peer@gmail.com, and Sonya Nevin, University of Roehampton, sonya.nevin@roehampton.ac.uk


Female portrait

Barbara Schulz (Illustrator)

Schulz is a professional comic artist. She is also a professor of comic art at the University of Wisconsin-Superior, MA, and lecturer at Minneapolis College of Art and Design, where she helped to establish and now runs the comic art degree programme. She has been working professionally in comics since 1991. Schulz created comic book art for DC, Dark Horse, Image, and Devils Due comics as well as illustrating numerous graphic novels.


Sources: 

Profile at the mcad.edu (accessed: March 8, 2018).

Profile at the cargocollective.com (accessed: March 8, 2018).


Bio prepared by Ayelet Peer, Bar Ilan University, ayelet.peer@gmail.com, and Sonya Nevin, University of Roehampton, sonya.nevin@roehampton.ac.uk


Male portrait

Paul D. Storrie (Author)

Storrie is a graphic novel author from Detroit. He worked for Caliber comics, DC comics, Marvel among others. Among his comic books are Perseus: The Hunt for Medusa's Head: A Greek Myth, Beowulf: Monster Slayer a British Legend, Yu the Great: Conquering the Flood and many more.


Sources:

Author's website (accessed: June 24, 2018).

Interview with the Author (accessed: June 24, 2018).


Bio prepared by Ayelet Peer, Bar Ilan University, ayelet.peer@gmail.com


Summary

This is a graphic novel retelling of the myth of Hercules from his youth to after the labours. It includes glossary, index and further reading. There are only 4 panels devoted to Hercules’ youth and then we are told that as a grown man Hercules was told by the oracle of Delphi (which was manipulated by Hera) to serve King Eurystheus. Unsurprisingly, there is no mention of the murders he committed, this being a children’s story. All the 12 labours are then portrayed and we also meet people Hercules helps along the way. Hera keeps intervening, even causing a fight between Hercules and the Amazons. The book ends with the note that (45) all his life Hercules never stopped making dangerous journeys and fighting against fearsome enemies, but those are stories for another time as if to leave the young readers curious about more of Hercules’ tales.

Analysis

According to the back of the book, the author relied on Thomas Bulfinch’s The Age of Fable and on Hamilton’s Mythology. The illustrator, it is stated, was influenced by classical Greek art. Towards the end, Hercules contemplates (33) again I am a thief for Eurystheus. I like it less every time. This is a rare glimpse into Hercules’ psyche, since his character is elsewhere not developed. He is more of the stereotypical muscle man. No definite reason is given for the labours since the murder of Hercules’ family by his own hand is missing. Therefore the labours could be seen as a pretext to exhibit Hercules’ muscles and super human strength as he is fighting different rivals.


Addenda

Illustrators: Steve Kurth (pencils), Barbara Schulz (ink).

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