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Mark Hess , Kathryn Lasky

Hercules: The Man, the Myth, the Hero

YEAR: 1997

COUNTRY: United States of America

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Title of the work

Hercules: The Man, the Myth, the Hero

Country of the First Edition

Country/countries of popularity

United States

Original Language

English

First Edition Date

1997

First Edition Details

Kathryn Lasky, Hercules: The Man, the Myth, the Hero. New York: Hyperion Books, 1997, 32 pp.

ISBN

9780786803293

Genre

Myths
Picture books

Target Audience

Children (Ages 5-9)

Cover

Missing cover

We are still trying to obtain permission for posting the original cover.


Author of the Entry:

Allison Rosenblum, Bar-Ilan University, allie.rose89@gmail.com

Peer-reviewer of the Entry:

Lisa Maurice, Bar-Ilan University, lisa.maurice@biu.ac.il

Elżbieta Olechowska, University of Warsaw, elzbieta.olechowska@gmail.com

Male portrait

Mark Hess , b. 1954
(Artist, Illustrator)

Mark Hess (1954) has a Fine Arts degree from the University of Colorado. He began his career as a painter in 1975 in New York, and won his first gold medal from the New York Art Directors Club in 1976. He currently has 41 pieces at the Smithsonian Museum in Washington, D. C., and has created 46 U.S. postal stamps and 12 United Nations stamps.  


Source:

Profile at the hessdesignworks.com (accessed: July 2, 2018).

Profile at the behance.net (accessed: July 2, 2018).


Bio prepared by Allison Rosenblum, Bar-Ilan University, allie.rose89@gmail.com


Courtesy of the Author.

Kathryn Lasky , b. 1944
(Author)

Lasky was born in Indianapolis, Indiana. She went to the University of Michigan. Her first job was writing for a fashion magazine. She has written over 100 books for children and adults, and is a Newberry Honor author. She has worked on multiple series such as Guardians of Ga’Hoole, Wolves of the Beyond, Horses of the Dawn, Daughters of the Sea, The Diaries, and The Deadlies.


Sources:

Official website (accessed: June 27, 2018).

Profile on Scholastic's website (accessed: June 27, 2018).


Bio prepared by Allison Rosenblum, Bar-Ilan University, allie.rose89@gmail.com


Summary

This of Hercules begins with his birth as “Palaemon” and Hera’s initial attempt on his life by sending the two serpents to his cradle. After accidentally killing his teacher, Palaemon’s mother sends him away. Although he thinks of himself as a monster, Palaemon goes on to make quite a name for himself as a strong warrior, not a monster, and was very happy until Hera tricks him into killing his family. This is when he becomes “Hercules”, Hera’s glory, and is sent to serve King Eurystheus and perform the Twelve Labours. The illustrations in this book are very realistic and reminiscent of Greek statuary.

Analysis

The story is told in first-person narration, explaining more about Hercules’ inner thoughts and feelings than about the Labours themselves. It runs through the Labours in five short pages, simply naming the task and moving on, highlighting instead the collective importance of Hercules’ journey as a man and not the specific details of each Labour and how he succeeded. It shows that Hercules’ glory does not stem only from completing the Labours successfully, but in conquering his own passions (triggered by Hera’s involvement), and that this is what elevates him to a god-like status. 



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Leaf pattern
Leaf pattern

Title of the work

Hercules: The Man, the Myth, the Hero

Country of the First Edition

Country/countries of popularity

United States

Original Language

English

First Edition Date

1997

First Edition Details

Kathryn Lasky, Hercules: The Man, the Myth, the Hero. New York: Hyperion Books, 1997, 32 pp.

ISBN

9780786803293

Genre

Myths
Picture books

Target Audience

Children (Ages 5-9)

Cover

Missing cover

We are still trying to obtain permission for posting the original cover.


Author of the Entry:

Allison Rosenblum, Bar-Ilan University, allie.rose89@gmail.com

Peer-reviewer of the Entry:

Lisa Maurice, Bar-Ilan University, lisa.maurice@biu.ac.il

Elżbieta Olechowska, University of Warsaw, elzbieta.olechowska@gmail.com

Male portrait

Mark Hess (Artist, Illustrator)

Mark Hess (1954) has a Fine Arts degree from the University of Colorado. He began his career as a painter in 1975 in New York, and won his first gold medal from the New York Art Directors Club in 1976. He currently has 41 pieces at the Smithsonian Museum in Washington, D. C., and has created 46 U.S. postal stamps and 12 United Nations stamps.  


Source:

Profile at the hessdesignworks.com (accessed: July 2, 2018).

Profile at the behance.net (accessed: July 2, 2018).


Bio prepared by Allison Rosenblum, Bar-Ilan University, allie.rose89@gmail.com


Courtesy of the Author.

Kathryn Lasky (Author)

Lasky was born in Indianapolis, Indiana. She went to the University of Michigan. Her first job was writing for a fashion magazine. She has written over 100 books for children and adults, and is a Newberry Honor author. She has worked on multiple series such as Guardians of Ga’Hoole, Wolves of the Beyond, Horses of the Dawn, Daughters of the Sea, The Diaries, and The Deadlies.


Sources:

Official website (accessed: June 27, 2018).

Profile on Scholastic's website (accessed: June 27, 2018).


Bio prepared by Allison Rosenblum, Bar-Ilan University, allie.rose89@gmail.com


Summary

This of Hercules begins with his birth as “Palaemon” and Hera’s initial attempt on his life by sending the two serpents to his cradle. After accidentally killing his teacher, Palaemon’s mother sends him away. Although he thinks of himself as a monster, Palaemon goes on to make quite a name for himself as a strong warrior, not a monster, and was very happy until Hera tricks him into killing his family. This is when he becomes “Hercules”, Hera’s glory, and is sent to serve King Eurystheus and perform the Twelve Labours. The illustrations in this book are very realistic and reminiscent of Greek statuary.

Analysis

The story is told in first-person narration, explaining more about Hercules’ inner thoughts and feelings than about the Labours themselves. It runs through the Labours in five short pages, simply naming the task and moving on, highlighting instead the collective importance of Hercules’ journey as a man and not the specific details of each Labour and how he succeeded. It shows that Hercules’ glory does not stem only from completing the Labours successfully, but in conquering his own passions (triggered by Hera’s involvement), and that this is what elevates him to a god-like status. 



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